Tag Archives: Welcome the Stranger

If We Forget That, Then Nothing Else Matters

Appropriately named, Parashat Mishpatim is filled with laws. Immediately after revelation at Sinai, this Torah portion is filled with all the laws that make up this covenant that the Israelites just entered with God. In the middle of all these Mishpatim, all these laws, about slaves and servants, about damages, sorceresses, and worshipping false Gods, we are simply told:

You shall not wrong a stranger or oppress a stranger, for you were strangers in Egypt (Ex. 22:20).

Literally, moments ago. In case the Israelites forgot, two parshiot ago, they were just freed from slavery. Seven chapters ago, they crossed a split sea to freedom.  But how quickly we forget that we too were strangers in a strange land. And then the Torah continues:

And Every widow and orphan you shall not mistreat (Ex.22:21).

The Mekhilta stipulates that one should not even mistreat them in the smallest or slightest way. These three are linked together in the middle of all these otherwise odd laws: do not mistreat the stranger, the widow, the orphan. Do not mistreat those who biblical society deemed to be the most vulnerable among us. Shemot Rabbah concludes that what caused the destruction of Jerusalem was when judges perverted the judgement of widows and orphans, when we no longer sought to be kind and compassionate towards the most vulnerable. Jersualem was destroyed when we took advantage of the most vulnerable. The Malbim even adds that the prohibition against oppressing orphans and widows is not meant to be specific towards orphans and widows. Rather, it is an example of a general rule that it is forbidden to take advantage of any person who is vulnerable and in a state of helplessness.

This is smack in the middle of all these laws. How often do we focus on the intricacies of ritual, or making sure we stick to the letter of the law, and how often do we ignore the divine mandate to look out for those most vulnerable? How often do we make sure we are loudly pronouncing each letter of the Torah chanted correctly, but refuse to speak up for the voiceless? How often do we make sure that our animals are slaughtered precisely, but ignore those who are food insecure?

We live in a society of haves and have-nots. And if we are so lucky to be part of the haves instead of the have nots, how often do we ignore the plight of the have-nots. Even though we all once were in a state of vulnerability. We too were strangers in a strange land. Too many speak about what it means to be a person of faith, and ignore how our faith commands us to treat other people. These commands are in the middle of these laws, in the middle of this Torah portion, because they are meant to buttress all the laws are them. They are the basis for everything. If we neglect the most vulnerable among us, then nothing else matters. If we ignore the struggle of those made in God’s divine image, then we are failing in our covenant with God.

New Jersey’s junior senator, Senator Cory Booker, is often quoted as saying:

“Don’t speak to me about your religion; first show it to me in how you treat other people. Don’t tell me how much you love your God; show me in how much you love all God’s children. Don’t preach to me your passion for your faith; teach me through your compassion for your neighbors. In the end, I’m not as interested in what you have to tell or sell as I am in how you choose to live and give.“

Among all these laws, laws that we struggle with, laws that we still follow every day, laws that no longer make sense in the society we are living in, let us not forget the law to take care of the most vulnerable around us. If we forget that, then nothing else matters.

-Rabbi Jesse M. Olitzky

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Our Jewish Community’s Commitment to Helping Refugees

The following message is being shared with the members of Congregation Beth El, Temple Sharey Tefilo-Israel, and Oheb Shalom Congregation.

Dear Friends,

The Torah (Deuteronomy 10:19) teaches us to welcome the stranger for we were once strangers in the land of Egypt. The commandment to welcome the stranger is, in fact, mentioned more often than any other in the entire Torah. After fleeing Egypt our ancestors wandered for 40 years in the wilderness. After the destruction of the Temple in 70CE our people wandered in exile for 2,000 years. After the Shoah many of our families were once again in search of a home. Ours is a history of wandering for, too often, we have been refugees seeking a safe haven from persecution. Now it is our turn to fulfill our obligation to welcome the stranger. 
For this reason, our three congregations, Congregation Beth El, Temple Sharey Tefilo-Israel, and Oheb Shalom Congregation, are joining together in our commitment to resettle refugee families in our community. Our synagogues are partnering with Church World Services to provide the most vulnerable refugees the opportunity to start again in the United States. 

Church World Services was born in 1946 in the aftermath of World War II. Their mission: Feed the hungry, clothe the naked, heal the sick, comfort the aged, shelter the homeless. Since their inception they have worked with countless faith-based organizations and have helped resettle thousands of refugees from crisis points throughout the world. We are proud that our community will be working hand-in-hand with CWS to ensure that our community is home for these families. 

In the coming weeks, there will be many opportunities to volunteer as we prepare for this/these families to arrive, and once they’ve settled in the area. As a first step, in order to prepare for their arrival, we have set up a fundraising page: https://www.gofundme.com/help-resettle-refugee-families. Please help us fulfill our obligation to welcome the stranger. 

May we all work to build a community and a world that is always welcoming.  

Rabbi Jesse Olitzky

Rabbi Daniel Cohen and Rabbi Allie Klein 

Rabbi Mark Cooper 

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